1.16.19 Praise & Prayer Prompt: Tithing

PRAISE & PRAYER PROMPT ••• Tithing is a deeply personal thing.

And let’s face it—talking about money can get uncomfortable.

But it’s come up in several conversations I’ve had lately.

That fact, coupled with the passage I read in the Bible this morning, has prompted me to talk about it today.

There are those who say that the 10% tithe of the Old Testament doesn’t apply to modern-day Christians.

Some feel that the New Testament’s lack of specific tithing direction makes it optional, or makes tithing a specific amount flexible, especially in context with 1 Corinthians 16:2, which says, “…you should set aside a sum of money in keeping with your income…”

I’m not here to tell you one way or the other because honestly, it’s between you and God.

I understand the conflicting feelings though…

I struggled for years about tithing.

It wasn’t that I didn’t want to give, but my husband and I were on a budget.

We didn’t think we could afford it.

But after a hard look at our spending habits, we determined that yes, we could give.

It was a matter of our personal priorities.

We ate out all the time.

We could easily reshuffle what we were spending on eating out and entertainment in order to tithe.

And we choose to give 10% of our gross.

For us, it’s easier to have a consistent number.

But more than that—tithing is about gratitude to God for all He’s given and it’s a matter of trusting Him to provide for all your needs.

Everything we have is a direct gift from God and it’s His anyway.

In 1 Chronicles 29:14b, David prayed, “For all things come from you, and of your own have we given you.”

But I encourage you to read the whole passage for yourself (1 Chronicles 29:1-17).

David and the Israelites gave what they had to the Temple Building Fund.

And the words used to describe the scene include “willingly,” “rejoiced,” “offered freely.”

I’ve heard it argued by both believers and non-believers that the church shouldn’t ask for money since it’s there to serve.

But that thought is ludicrous to me.

No one thinks twice about the Red Cross asking for funding and they are service-based.

All organizations have real costs!

Those who subscribe to this way of thinking would be upset if preachers had to go find other jobs because they couldn’t afford to feed their families on zero salary.

Besides, it’s Biblical to pay our preachers.

1 Timothy 5:17-18 says, “Let the elders who rule well be considered worthy of double honor, especially those who labor in preaching and teaching. For the Scripture says, ‘You shall not muzzle an ox when it treads out the grain,’ and, ‘The laborer deserves his wages.’”

Don’t get me wrong.

I get that there are those who have pushed too aggressively for money, and often for personal gain.

But any non-profit (church or otherwise) should be transparent with their spending.

If you don’t think your church is spending wisely, address it.

Or find a new church.

But don’t let that stop you from giving.

I’ll share too that my husband and I don’t give 100% of our tithe to our church.

Most of it goes there, but we support a couple of other organizations we believe in such as Proverbs 31 Ministries, In Touch Ministries, and Got Questions.

And we trust the way the money is spent.

If we ever have questions, we address them or redirect our funds.

Again, I’m just sharing what we do.

If you tithe regularly, you already know the joy of this kind of giving-worship.

It’s an opportunity to honor God for all He’s provided.

If you don’t tithe, pray about it.

GotQuestions.org has several great articles on tithing that I recommend too.

Today, as you pray, borrow David’s prayer, “For all things come from you, and of your own have we given you.”

Thank God the Father for all He’s provided.

Ask the Holy Spirit to help you trust in God’s provision in all circumstances.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s